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October 13 - 19, 2017

  

Friday, October 13, 2017

SOURCE Canned Food Drive: Mon, Oct 2 - Fri, Oct 13 (Multi-Day Event)
All Day

Bloomberg School of Public Health

Help local populations experiencing food insecurity by donating unopened and unexpired canned food items! Donation bin locations: JHSPH - E1002, SOURCE Office (W1600) and the first floor student lounge; SON - lobby entrance; SOM AMEB - lobby (by stairs).
Thesis Defense Seminar
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Bloomberg School of Public Health

Role of Parenting Self Efficacy in Promoting Child Development in HIV-affected Families in Uganda Jura Augustinavicius, PhD Candidate Department of Mental Health

Monday, October 16, 2017

Seminars in Research in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Bloomberg School of Public Health

Seminars in Research in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

"Freezing Mitochondrial Dynamics"

Hiromi Sesaki, PhD
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Cell Biology

The International Institute for Primary Health Care in Ethiopia Seminar
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM

Bloomberg School of Public Health

The International Institute for Primary Health Care in Ethiopia: An Update and the Supportive Role of Johns Hopkins

Speakers:
Professor Mengesha Admassu, MD, MPH
Executive Director
International Institute for Primary Health Care – Ethiopia
 
Henry Perry, MD, PHD, MPH
Senior Scientist
Department of International Health 
Coordinator for Johns Hopkins, International Institute for Primary Health Care – Ethiopia
Lunch served.

RSVP by October 13 to Winnie Belai at wbelai1@jhu.edu.
Promise and Pitfalls of Proactive Gun Law Enforcement
12:10 PM - 1:20 PM

Promise and Pitfalls of Proactive Gun Law Enforcement

Cynthia Lum, PhD

Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy, George Mason University

12:10 – 1:20 PM

Hampton House

Room: Auditorium B14-B

Contact Information: Shani Buggs | sbuggs1@jhu.edu

Biostatistics Help: Faculty, Staff, Pre and Post Doc Walk-In Clinic
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Biostatistics consulting is available to all Johns Hopkins University faculty, staff, pre and post docs conducting clinical and translational research. 1:30 – 2:30 PM Wolfe Street Building Room: E3142
Tatsuki Kawakami "An exterior nonlinear elliptic problem with a dynamical boundary condition"
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Homewood

Speaker: Tatsuki Kawakami, (Ryukoko U) Abstract: We consider the nonnegative solution of a semilinear elliptic equation with a dynamical boundary condition. Several results on existence, nonexistence and large-time behavior of small solutions were obtained before for the half-space case. In this talk we study the effects of the change of the domain from the half-space to the exterior of the unit ball. We obtain the critical exponent with respect to the existence of solutions and the decay rate of small global-in-time solutions. Furthermore, we show that local solvability is equivalent to global solvability. This talk is based on the joint work with M. Fila (Comenius Univ.) and K. Ishige (Tohoku Univ.).
Inbar Klang "Factorization homology and topological Hochschild cohomology of Thom spectra."
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Homewood

Speaker: Inbar Klang, Stanford Abstract: By a theorem of Lewis, the Thom spectrum of an n-fold loop map to BO is an E_n-ring spectrum. I will discuss a project studying the factorization homology and the E_n topological Hochschild cohomology of such Thom spectra, and talk about some applications, such as computations, and a duality between topological Hochschild homology and cohomology of certain Thom spectra. Time permitting, I will discuss connections to topological field theories. This talk will include an introduction to factorization homology.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

The Assault on Women's Health and Rights in the Current Administration
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Bloomberg School of Public Health

Dr. Decker and Françoise Girard present "The Assault on Women's Health and Rights in the Current Administration" Noon-1:30 pm Sheldon Hall (W1214)
[multiple] DMH Faculty Candidate Seminar - Gazi F. Azad, PhD
12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

Bloomberg School of Public Health

Department of Mental Health Faculty Candidate Seminar

Gazi F. Azad, PhD
Clinical Psychologist
Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD)
Kennedy Krieger Institute

Partners in School: A Consultation Model for Parents and Teachers of Children with Autism
Event Image  CTL Tips and Techniques (Drop-in)
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

The Center for Teaching and Learning is pleased to announce walk-in office hours hosted by a CTL Instructional Designer. Stop by to discuss your course, CoursePlus tools and any other related questions you may have. CTL is here to help! 
Location: Wolfe St. W9514
Biostatistics Help: Faculty, Staff, Pre and Post Doc Walk-In Clinic
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Biostatistics consulting is available to all Johns Hopkins University faculty, staff, pre and post docs conducting clinical and translational research. 1:30 – 2:30 PM Wolfe Street Building Room: E3144
Faculty Candidate Seminar, International Health
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Department of International Health, Health Systems Program
Faculty candidate seminar

Assessing Welfare Spillovers: Using Regression Discontinuity to Evaluate the Impact of ART Initiation on Household Food Security in South Africa

Bryan Patenaude, PhD 
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Department of Global Health & Population 

Light refreshments will be served

For more information, please contact Antonio Trujillo, atrujil1@jhu.edu.

W5008, Wolfe Street Building 
 
Luigi Lombardi "Pushforwards of pluricanonical bundles via morphisms to abelian varieties.""
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Homewood

Speaker: Luigi Lombardi, Stony Brook University Title: A decomposition theorem for the direct images of pluricanonical bundles to abelian varieties Abstract: I will describe a direct-sum decomposition in pull-backs of ample sheaves for the pushforwards of pluricanonical bundles via morphisms from smooth projective varieties to an abelian varieties. The techniques to proving this decomposition rely on generic vanishing theory, and the use of semipositive singular hermitian metrics. Time permitting, I will provide an application of the above decomposition towards the global generation and very ampleness properties of pluricanonical divisors defined on singular varieties of general type. The talk is based on a recent joint work with M. Popa and C. Schnell.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Biostatistics Help: Faculty, Staff, Pre and Post Doc Walk-In Clinic
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Biostatistics consulting is available to all Johns Hopkins University faculty, staff, pre and post docs conducting clinical and translational research. 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Wolfe Street Building Room: E3142 Contact Information: Nita James | jhbc@jhu.edu
[multiple] DMH Wednesday Noon Seminar - Alex McCourt, JD, MPH
12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

Bloomberg School of Public Health

DMH Wednesday Noon Seminar Series

Alex McCourt, JD, MPH
Doctoral student
Department of Health Policy and Management
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

State Firearm Laws and Suicide: Implications of transfer and public carrying policies

Continuing discussion with students from 1 - 1:30 PM in HH188.
Faculty Candidate Series - Sr. Faculty Adolescent Health
12:15 PM - 1:20 PM

Bloomberg School of Public Health

Reenvisioning Adolescent Health Promotion:  Trauma, Resilience, and Opportunity

Elizabeth Miller, MD, PhD
Director, Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

Professor of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
 

Contact Information
Deenah Darom
410-955-3385
ddarom@jhu.edu

 

Roy Lederman “Hyper-Molecules” in Cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM)."
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Homewood

Speaker: Roy Lederman,Princeton University Abstract: Cryo-EM is an imaging technology that is revolutionizing structural biology; the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017 was recently awarded to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson “for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution". Cryo-electron microscopes produce a large number of very noisy two-dimensional projection images of individual frozen molecules. Unlike related tomography methods, such as computed tomography (CT), the viewing direction of each image is unknown. The unknown directions, together with extreme levels of noise and additional technical factors, make the determination of the structure of molecules challenging. Unlike other structure determination methods, such as x-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), cryo-EM produces measurements of individual molecules and not ensembles of molecules. Therefore, cryo-EM could potentially be used to study mixtures of different conformations of molecules. While current algorithms have been very successful at analyzing homogeneous samples, and can recover some distinct conformations mixed in solutions, the determination of multiple conformations, and in particular, continuums of similar conformations (continuous heterogeneity), remains one of the open problems in cryo-EM. I will discuss the “hyper-molecules” approach to continuous heterogeneity, and the numerical tools and analysis methods that we are developing in order to recover such hyper-molecules.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Biostatistics Help: Faculty, Staff, Pre and Post Doc Walk-In Clinic
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Biostatistics consulting is available to all Johns Hopkins University faculty, staff, pre and post docs conducting clinical and translational research. 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Wolfe Street Building Room: E3144 Contact Information: Nita James | jhbc@jhu.edu
The Regulation of Nicotine: A Public Health Discussion with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Please join Dean Ellen J. Mackenzie and me for an incredible event on Thursday, October 19 at 1 pm in Sommer Hall. The School will host the leadership of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for a discussion about the agency’s groundbreaking vision to reduce nicotine in cigarettes to non-addictive levels.  Leading national experts in tobacco control, including Professor Joanna Cohen, will participate in the agency’s first major engagement on this topic with the public health community.

Tune into the webcast and learn more about our speakers here: https://www.jhsph.edu/offices-and-services/practice-and-training/news-and-events/the-regulation-of-nicotine.html

For more information, please contact the Office of Public Health Practice and Training at: publichealthpractice@jhu.edu or at (443) 287-8541.
Daniel Zaharopol "Advanced Mathematical Pathways for Underserved Students."
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Homewood

Speaker: Daniel Zaharopol Executive Director, Art of Problem Solving Foundation; Director, Bridge to Enter Advanced Mathematics Abstract: Those of us in science and math careers had many experiences to help us get here. From our own independent projects, to a teacher who took a special interest and gave us extra problems, to clubs and competitions, we were shaped not just by the standard school curriculum but in how we went beyond it. Now imagine someone who wants to be a scientist or a mathematician entering their freshman year of college---but who doesn't have that same preparation. College is a difficult transition for everyone, but on top of the usual challenges, an underserved student will have far fewer academic experiences that demanded college-level thinking, and they might be entering a very different culture. Far too many low-income and underrepresented students drop out at this point, contributing to the gaps we see in attainment at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Everyone talks about the need for greater diversity in math and science, but what can we actually do about it? I will first look at the kind of thinking that our fields demand of us and the preparation many of us received. Then, I'll share the progress made at Bridge to Enter Advanced Mathematics (BEAM), a program I started in New York City which provides this pathway for underserved students. In particular, I will talk about what it means (and takes) to teach deep, rich, proof-based mathematics to young students with disadvantaged backgrounds, and what is required to coach them into taking up other opportunities in the future.
Cognitive Science Department Colloquium on Scheduled Thursdays. See details for dates.
3:45 PM - 5:00 PM

Homewood

Cognitive Science Department Colloquium Presentation on Scheduled Thursdays. Please see http://web.jhu.edu/cogsci/events/Colloquia for schedule and full details.

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